Daily Scrum Patterns: The Sprint Backlog at the Daily Scrum

This blog post is part of a series of blog posts on Daily Scrum patterns.  For some background, you might find it useful to read my previous article on a simple Scrum Patterns framework.  Daily Scrum Patterns fall under the category of “Scrum Technique Patterns”, as introduced in that article.

Today we’ll talk about “Obstacle Resolution Patterns”

Notes:

“The Sprint Backlog at the Daily Scrum” Patterns

While it’s a popular and proven practice to <View the Sprint Backlog at the Daily Scrum>, it’s a controversial practice to <Update the Sprint Backlog at the Daily Scrum>, as the updating can detract from the true objectives and focus of the Daily Scrum in some situations.

Also, don’t forget to be creative and <Create Your Own Pattern>, and don’t ever hesitate to use a technique that is not described by a documented pattern.

The Sprint Backlog at the Daily Scrum Patterns:

Daily Scrum Patterns: Who Attends the Daily Scrum?

This blog post is part of a series of blog posts on Daily Scrum patterns.  For some background, you might find it useful to read my previous article on a simple Scrum Patterns framework.  Daily Scrum Patterns fall under the category of “Scrum Technique Patterns”, as introduced in that article.

Today we’ll talk about “Obstacle Resolution Patterns”

Notes:

Who Attends? Patterns

According to the Scrum Guide, the Development Team must attend. With many teams, and especially Shu level teams, the <Scrum Master Attends>. It’s usually a good practice if the <Product Owner Attends> so that they can help the Development Team if needed, often times at <The After Party>. It’s usually not good if an <Authority Figure Attends> on a regular basis.

Also, don’t forget to be creative and <Create Your Own Pattern>, and don’t ever hesitate to use a technique that is not described by a documented pattern.

Who Attends? Patterns:

Daily Scrum Patterns: Who Participates in the Daily Scrum?

This blog post is part of a series of blog posts on Daily Scrum patterns.  For some background, you might find it useful to read my previous article on a simple Scrum Patterns framework.  Daily Scrum Patterns fall under the category of “Scrum Technique Patterns”, as introduced in that article.

Today we’ll talk about “Obstacle Resolution Patterns”

Notes:

Who Participates? Patterns

The Scrum Guide says that “the Scrum Master enforces the rule that only Development Team members participate in the Daily Scrum.” However, some practitioners think it might be ok if the <Product Owner Participates> in the Daily Scrum. Having said that, it is incorrect Scrum if a <Non Scrum Team Member Participates> in the Daily Scrum, so consider using <The After Party> to let non Scrum Team Members communicate with the Scrum Team.

Also, don’t forget to be creative and <Create Your Own Pattern>, and don’t ever hesitate to use a technique that is not described by a documented pattern.

Who Participates? Patterns:

Daily Scrum Patterns: Facilitation Patterns

This blog post is part of a series of blog posts on Daily Scrum patterns.  (More coming in future posts over the next weeks).  For some background, you might find it useful to read my previous article on a simple Scrum Patterns framework.  Daily Scrum Patterns fall under the category of “Scrum Technique Patterns”, as introduced in that article.

Notes:

Facilitation Patterns

Most teams hold the Daily Scrum as a <Standup Meeting>, but this is not required in Scrum, and some teams that are distributed feel like it’s ok to hold a <Sit Down Meeting> so long as they are faithfully executing the objectives of the Daily Scrum.

Teams just starting with Scrum might benefit from a <Close Facilitator>, so long as that doesn’t turn into a <Controlling Facilitator>. A bad practice is facilitating a Daily Scrum such that it <Turns into a Waterfall Status Meeting>.

Also, don’t forget to be creative and <Create Your Own Pattern>, and don’t ever hesitate to use a technique that is not described by a documented pattern.

Facilitation Patterns:

Bradley Bug Chart Referenced in Awesome New Scrum Book

The Bradley Bug Chart was referenced in an awesome new Scrum Book that is now on the market.

Background

I got an email from this guy named Rich one day who wanted to talk by phone and ask me some questions about the Bradley Bug Chart. A great collaboration ensued, and I incorporated some of his suggestions into my chart. A couple of weeks later, he asked me to review Chapter 1 of this book he was writing. I have some of the highest standards around, and I’m not easily impressed, but that first chapter was extraordinary! Through that one chapter, and the conversations with Rich, I realized this guy knew Scrum inside and out. I then reviewed and commented on a few more chapters. I get asked to do unpaid reviews often, but I only spend my time on things that I think are excellent for the Agile community. I’ve spent some time reviewing another book that hasn’t been published yet, and it too, is a great one for the industry in my opinion. More on that one when it gets published.

The Bradley Bug Chart Gets Called Out

A little while later, Rich asked me if he could refer to my Bradley Bug Chart in his book(see page 277), in a section on how to handle bugs in Scrum. I was ecstatic, in part just having my work get recognition, but it was also recognition from someone I highly respected myself. It was great. I also re-wrote some of the praise that I gave Rich on that Chapter 1 review as a quote for his book. Rich also ended up quoting me a few times in other parts of the book, particularly in the chapter on “Continuous Improvement.” I’m not trying to brag here, just sharing the satisfaction of seeing some of my hard work and learning as being objectively recognized in the community.

About the Book

Here is the quote I wrote for his book:

  • “Finally a book about Scrum from the Development Team’s point of view. Richard’s description of the best and worst ways to implement Scrum is priceless. The first chapter alone is one of the best descriptions of ‘Scrum done well’ that I’ve ever seen.” — Charles Bradley

I highly recommend his book for anyone working with Scrum and Microsoft Visual Studio/.Net technologies.

Here is the book:

PSDBook_Small

Small Caveat: Rich is and was a trainer with Scrum.org, and since our initial collaboration, Rich inspired me to become a trainer for Scrum.org as well. So, while none of this was true at the time of the above events, I wanted to mention that we are now both trainers for Scrum.org. I have no financial interests in his book, whatsoever, and my journey to become a Scrum.org trainer came after my review of his book. Thanks Rich!

New User Stories Article on Agile Atlas

I recently co-authored a new article on User Stories with fellow Scrum Trainer Mark Levison. I think it’s one of the better introductory articles to User Stories on the net, and having the credibility of the Agile Atlas is great. Ron Jeffries, the co-inventor of User Stories, was one of the main reviewers of the article, so that was a little intimidating. But, he gave it high praise and only suggested a couple of minor edits. The article is now my “go-to” article on an introduction to User Stories.

Here is the article: http://agileatlas.org/gasps/article/user-stories

Other Good User Story Links:

Daily Scrum Patterns: Obstacle Resolution Patterns

This blog post is part of a series of blog posts on Daily Scrum patterns.  For some background, you might find it useful to read my previous article on a simple Scrum Patterns framework.  Daily Scrum Patterns fall under the category of “Scrum Technique Patterns”, as introduced in that article.

Today we’ll talk about “Obstacle Resolution Patterns”

Notes:

Obstacle Resolution

Many teams <Defer Obstacle Resolution> until after the Daily Scrum, but some teams <Allow Obstacle Resolution> if they can still avoid busting the 15 minute time-box. Having said that, it’s generally considered a bad practice if your team decides to <Save All Obstacles For the Daily Scrum>.

Some teams use <The After Party> to handle obstacle resolution and other conversations inappropriate for the Daily Scrum, and that’s probably fine unless <The After Party Defeats the Purpose of the Daily Scrum>.

Also, don’t forget to be creative and <Create Your Own Pattern>, and don’t ever hesitate to use a technique that is not described by a documented pattern.

Obstacle Resolution Patterns:

What Daily Scrum Patterns do you like to use?  Sound off in the comments.

Daily Scrum Patterns: Talk Order

This blog post is part of a series of blog posts on Daily Scrum patterns.  (More coming in future posts over the next weeks).  For some background, you might find it useful to read my previous article on a simple Scrum Patterns framework.  Daily Scrum Patterns fall under the category of “Scrum Technique Patterns”, as introduced in that article.

Notes:

Talk Order

Most teams start out with a <Round Robin> approach. Teams that are distributed or are highly self organizing might use the <Talking Stick> approach. Some teams become better at getting work done if they <Walk The Items> instead, but use caution as that approach can lead to a Daily Scrum that <Turns Into Waterfall Status Meeting>.

Also, don’t forget to be creative and <Create Your Own Pattern>, and don’t ever hesitate to use a technique that is not described by a documented pattern.

Talk Order Patterns:

Release Cadence Report: Agilists and Software Developers, Take 10 Minutes to Help the Software Community Get Better

The blog post I’m writing to you today is to encourage you to take 10 minutes of your time to fill out the “Release Cadence Report” created by Ryan Cromwell, an Agile community leader that I respect very much.  I get emails often from people wanting me to fill out Agile surveys, and I usually just don’t have the time.

This survey is different, and I took the time(about 10 minutes) to fill it out.  I suggest you do as well.

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In short, please take 10 minutes to take the survey, then pass along the link to fellow software professionals and Agile enthusiasts.  The survey will only be open for a limited time, so please just take the time and get ‘er done!  I’ll let Ryan take it from there.  See below.
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Charles Bradley
Professional Scrum Trainer, Scrum.org
Scrum Coach-in-Chief, ScrumCrazy.com
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The current information and data available to organizations contemplating Scrum, Agile, Kanban, XP, etc. have grown very stale.  For the most part, the same practices, frameworks, methodologies and trends show up year after year with little exception.  The question is no longer if Agile is the place to be, but how to get there.  I think we are in need of an evolution in our discussion of Agile.
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Today I opened the Release Cadence Report survey to move the needle towards what I hope is a more useful conversation than the state of Agile.  The report will be publish freely so that everyone can look at the relationship between Release Cadence and things like Market Capability, Employee Satisfaction, Patterns & Techniques used to achieve the cadence, Methodologies, and more.  With it, I hope that we can start talking about how companies have navigated their way to successful products as opposed to iterated their way towards challenged projects.
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You can fill out the survey at:

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Ryan Cromwell
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“Kanban vs. Scrum: The Big Smackdown” — Video now on YouTube

A few weeks ago, I participated on a panel discussion at the January meeting of AgileDenver.  Be sure you click through to the link with the meeting description before you view the videos.

Part 1
http://youtu.be/nhfhU0hqyQ4

Part 2
http://youtu.be/sfBILgeUS2w

I hope no one will take this as me having a personal jihad on Kanban, because that is not true.  I do, however, hope to inspire people to stop, and think twice, before incorrectly applying Kanban as a software development approach.  In my earlier post, I talk about why I think that is a mistake.

I also hope no one will take this as me thinking Scrum is always better than Kanban or vice versa.  Context is everything, and I simply suggest that those approaches should be applied to the context for which they were designed.  I think people should also give great deference to the creators of the respective approaches in this regard, so as to avoid what Martin Fowler calls semantic diffusion.  While Fowler calls it semantic diffusion, I have always known it more simply as the telephone game.  Luckily, we have good shepherds around like Anderson, Schwaber, and Sutherland, to remind us of the original ideas.

I also want to reassure my blog followers that I don’t intend to spend a lot more time writing about Kanban vs. Scrum.  I have some new articles that are very Scrum specific coming soon.

Related Articles:

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